Drinking Water Institute

Michigan, Ohio and Ontario
April 2 - 8, 2017

 

 

Lack of access to clean, safe drinking water is often seen as a problem suffered in "developing" countries. Recent events in North America, however, have highlighted the fact that our own water is not to be taken for granted. 

There is no better place to explore these issues than the Great Lakes -where 40 million people get drinking water from a basin holding one-fifth of all of the world's available fresh water. From April 2ndthrough the 8th, 2017, IJNR will get journalists out from behind their desks and take them into the field to see how safe, clean drinking water is "made" and what issues threaten that supply. 

During this expenses-paid, weeklong fellowship journalists will: 

  • Tour the water treatment plant in Toledo, Ohio to learn what's being done to prevent a future event like the 2014 algal bloom in Lake Erie that cut off the water supply of half a million people. 
  • Travel to Flint, Michigan to talk with residents about how they're dealing with the aftermath of the lead crisis and meet city and state officials trying to restore faith in the municipal water system. 
  • Spend a day in Walkerton, Ontario, where a deadly e. coli outbreak in 2000 brought the issue of drinking water security and agricultural runoff to the front page, leading to the creation of strict new water laws and the state-of-the-art Walkerton Clean Water Centre, where thousands of Ontario water providers have been trained to manage their own supply. 
  • Speak with officials in Guelph, Ontario about their concerns over the future of their public drinking water aquifers as both their growing population and private water-bottling companies like Nestle seek to draw water from the same wells.
  • Learn how nutrient pollution and a resulting "dead zone" in Lake Erie complicate the job of the water department in Cleveland. 
  • Meet scientists and engineers working on the latest clean water technologies.

Join us as we explore these and other to-be-determined issues in our freshwater supply and security. IJNR will also provide training sessions in some of the latest digital media technologies and other techniques to improve writing and reporting on natural resource issues. Participants will return to work armed with story ideas, background knowledge, expert sources and training to tell these stories better and inform and engage their readers, listeners and viewers across North America. 

To Apply:
Submit cover letter, resume, work samples and recommendation letter via Submittable

Questions?
Contact@IJNR.org

When: 
Applications due Friday, February 10
Institute to be held Sunday, April 2 - Saturday, April 8

Where:
Michigan, Ohio and Ontario

About IJNR

The mission of the Institute for Journalism & Natural Resources (IJNR) is to advance public understanding and civic engagement about environment, natural resource, public health and development issues through better journalism. IJNR conducts expenses-paid, expedition-style training and professional development programs for journalists at all career stages and from all sorts and sizes of news outlets, ranging from newspapers and magazines to radio, television and online operations. 

Supporters of this program include the Joyce Foundation as well as other foundations and individual donors. 

IJNR maintains editorial independence and control in all of its programming and decision-making.